A study performed at the Italian Piemonte University and published in 2008 implied that all cannabinoids help the immune system to fight bacteria. Especially potent are five cannabinoids (including CBD), with the study focusing on antibiotic-resistant strains of the Staphylococcus Aureus, a relevant example of the antibiotics abuse the last few decades have witnessed.

While it is still classed illegal on a Federal level, individual U.S. states have adopted a more lenient policy towards this plant and some states now allow it for recreational use. The easing up of state laws has also allowed researchers to explore this miraculous plant and only recently has it been found to be an effective treatment for a variety of medical problems due to its CBD oil benefits. From cancer, anorexia, pain and inflammation management it seems like medical marijuana is placing a strong footing within the medical industry.
A study from 2016 worked with 214 people with epilepsy. The study participants added oral doses of 2 to 5mg of CBD per day to their existing anti-epilepsy medications. The study’s researchers monitored the participants for 12 weeks, recording any negative side effects and checking on the frequency of their seizures. Overall, participants had 36.5 percent fewer seizures per month. However, severe adverse effects were recorded in 12 percent of the participants.
          Although CBD oil has been legalized in most states, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is subject to a very different set of restrictions. Like the CBD, THC is the cannabinoid that can be extracted from the cannabis plant. Although many petroleum products based on the CBD sell themselves as insulators and THC-free, the absence of federal regulations on these products means you can be deceived.
Oils are hot in the beauty world. As a beauty editor, I’ve slathered everything short of butter onto my face: argan, coconut, rosehip, sandalwood, chia, neroli, calendula, mandarin, macadamia, rice bran, seabuckthorn, patchouli, grapefruit seed, sesame seed, soybean, sweet almond, pomegranate seed, lemon myrtle, sunflower seed—even extra virgin olive oil from my pantry when I was desperate. I’ve washed my face with oil-based cleansers, and dabbed expensive mixtures being sold as “face oils” onto my skin in hopes of achieving that Instagram-ready glow. Contrary to popular belief, the right oil is actually good for your face and won’t clog your pores. Your skin needs a reasonable amount of oil to do its business; as a matter of fact, if you scrub away all your natural face oil (as I was prone to do with rubbing alcohol as a frustrated and misguided pizza-faced teen), you may actually be prone to more breakouts as your skin tries to make up for the imbalance. As cannabis meets up with the mainstream beauty world, cannabidiol (CBD) oil may be the next big thing.
In one survey, parents of children who suffer from treatment-resistant epilepsy and use CBD were asked about the benefits. 19 parents were included, 84% of which said that CBD reduced the frequency of seizures. Two parents said that CBD completely resolved seizures. Parents also reported improved alertness, sleep, and mood. Some side effects were drowsiness and fatigue [54].
        How does CBD work? The human body contains an extensive network of constitutive receptors, the endocannabinoid system, which is essential for maintaining general well-being while helping the system support many of our body's physical processes. Cannabinoids and CBD integrates into these receptors, which help the body in its efforts to maintain good health.
‘The media has no doubt helped drive this popularity,’ says Dr Sarah Brewer, medical director at Healthspan. ‘However, the main drive is because people who take it experience the benefits very quickly, and “word of mouth” is a powerful thing. CBD oil also has such a wide range of benefits, reducing anxiety, promoting relaxation, ensuring a good night’s sleep, reducing pain perception and improving general feelings of wellbeing. It therefore appeals to a wide range of people.’
As more and more states legalize the use of marijuana, a product known as CBD oil has surged in popularity. A chemical compound found in the cannabis plant, CBD, or cannabidiol, is non-intoxicating and does not cause the noticeable euphoric effects associated with tetrahydrocannabinol (or THC, another marijuana compound). Products marketed as CBD oil may contain THC.
But it also requires careful research before making a purchase. Because the cannabis plant readily absorbs pesticides, heavy metals and other chemicals that are in the soil and water, it’s so important that cannabis plants are frequently tested while they are growing. And it’s up to manufactures to test CBD products, too. When you are shopping for CBD oil, look for products that have been tested for contaminants and for CBD vs. THC levels.

This mint-green bath bomb, made by Los Angeles-based De La Beuh, combines the invigorating aromatherapy of peppermint oil with the pain relief benefits of CBD. I sat in the bath with this bath bomb soak for an hour—until the water ran cold—when I had both cramps and lower back aches, and while it doesn’t beat ingesting a painkiller, it did help soothe my pains so that I fell asleep as soon as I hit the pillow. De La Beuh sells bath bombs in many varieties—including a glittery Kaleidoscope version that will turn your bath into “unicorn” colors—so your preference just depends on your preferred aroma.

The Secret For Longevity Massage Oil is another choice that’s great for users looking for a relaxing massage experience or relief from a wide range of body pain. It’s filled with a full spectrum hemp extract, which delivers a wide range of benefits such as anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic actions. This massage oil is also known to boost local circulation and cell regrowth. This product has been formulated to provide an easy-glide experience during use for the most enjoyable massage possible. For the best results, prepare your skin with a warm shower and apply the oil while your skin is warm and moist.


As one might expect from the information presented in the previous sections of this article, the position of cannabidiol (both from a medical and from an institutional point of view) is one of uncertainty. To add insult to injury, private companies (especially those targeting immediate profit with a minimum of investment) take advantage of the loopholes in legislation to gain from the media exposure that CBD has had in the past few years.
As revealed by the results of a study published by the Addiction Journal and performed by University College London, smokers wishing to quit and treated with one 800mg dose of CBD, saw 40 percent more success in the first week of their attempt when using CBD products, than those treated with a placebo. Those treated with even a low dose of CBD claimed fewer intrusive thoughts, enabling them to go about their daily lives without the need for a cigarette, unlike those who were not given the cannabinoid. (6)
Did you know that cannabis oil contains all 21 known amino acids? Plus it’s rich in essential fatty acids such as Omega-3 and Omega-6 which are vital for our internal body and skin. These acids help combat daily problems that our skin is the first to take on, whether it be from inclement weather, sun exposure, dry climates, UV or other daily factors. Problems that can lead to a variety of medical issues such as eczema, psoriasis and even skin cancer.
Low Blood Pressure and Lightheadedness – an effect of CBD that may seem somewhat counterintuitive, an almost immediate (though small) decrease in blood pressure has been reported at the exposure to high doses, causing the associated lightheadedness, albeit not for long periods. Nevertheless, it could be significant for individuals taking blood pressure medication.
‘In doses used as a food supplement, CBD poses few risks, and side effects are unusual but can include a dry mouth or drowsiness,’ reveals Dr Brewer. ‘Higher doses used medically are well tolerated, and there are no serious safety concerns. A World Health Organization report issued in 2017 concluded that cannabidiol does not appear to have abuse potential or cause harm.'
We have receptors for cannabinoids in the whole body, but the first type (CB1) are very dense in the pain pathways of the brain, spine, and nerves. The second type (CB2) are more important for the immune system but is also involved in inflammation. By gently acting on both pathways, our internal cannabinoids and CBD can balance both pain and inflammation [64].

It all starts with the connection between the endocannabinoid system and intestinal function/motility. Recent studies have found that the transmitters regulated by the endocannabinoid system are located throughout the human body. Some of these transmitters are responsible for gut function; when imbalanced, negative effects are likely to occur. (41)
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