The anti-emetic and anti-nausea effect of marijuana is a centuries-old known fact. Nevertheless, as early as twenty years ago, the effect was attributed to the actions of THC. Continuous research into other cannabinoids has proven that many other phytocannabinoids produce the same desired effect. At present, the FDA recommends two drugs featuring cannabinoids, in which CBD has the highest concentration, in the treatment of nausea induced by chemotherapy – nabilone and dronabinol. Though in its infancy, promising studies exist which suggest that one day CBD may be incorporated into cancer therapies.
Furthermore, this number is expected to grow. According to the CDC, it is estimated that by 2040, over 78 million adults will have arthritis that has been diagnosed by a doctor, with 43% of those individuals limited in terms of activity because of the disease, without taking into effect other conditions that contribute to arthritis side effects, like growing obesity numbers and more.

This is why Amanda Oliver, 31, a career consultant in Charleston, SC, pops a CBD gummy bear each night before bed. “I used to lie there tossing and turning as my mind raced from work projects to whether I had set the home alarm,” Oliver says. One piece of candy with 15 milligrams (mg) of CBD is enough to shut off her brain and facilitate sleep. She also swears by the CBD oil she takes at the height of her period, which she says quells her debilitating cramps.
The cannabis plant contains a unique group of carbon compounds often referred to a phytocannabinoids. The most common ingredient is THC, which creates the euphoric high effect. Due to the THC element in the plant, marijuana is often associated with a stoner stigma of people only wanting to get high. But that is far from the truth. Cannabis also contains other medicinal compounds including cannabinol, cannabigerol, cannabidiol, and cannabichromene.
×