Sol CBD creates and carries various skin care products, but one of our favorites is the Nourish Formula. Made in small batches to ensure quality and potency, this 30 mL bottle (according to the company) “brings your skin back to health with a powerful synergistic blend of herbs and cannabinoids.” The herbs they speak of include rosehip and rosemary, as well as some soothing essential oils like ylang ylang and lavender.
There’s good reason to love USA-made hemp products, but this European product is a world-class product. The CBD in the Endoca Body Butter is mixed with a simple concoction of shea butter, palm oil, cocoa seed butter, cannabis sativa seed oil, coconut oil, root starch, vanilla, beeswax, and vitamin E. These simple and effective ingredients are so pure, you can actually eat this body butter!
Before I even checked the ingredients list and saw that cocoa seed butter was involved, my first impression was that this body butter smelled like chocolate, so much so that my stomach rumbled with hunger because it was 4pm and I hadn’t eaten lunch yet. Don’t the “whipped” descriptor fool you—unlike most body butters you’ve used, this formula is solid to the touch, a balm rather than a cream. But that might be exactly what you want if you’re looking for a CBD-infused treatment anyway—something that feels extra-nourishing and almost medicinal. Luckily, it smells incredible in a subtle, natural way, not like other body butters with artificial tropical fruit scents.
A study highlighting this was performed approximately one decade ago. The study found a link between IBS sufferers and clinical endocannabinoid deficiency, which relates back to the fact that the system directly impacts intestinal motility and function. When CBD was used to activate and regulate the endocannabinoid system, sufferers of IBS saw significant symptom improvement. (42)
Oils are hot in the beauty world. As a beauty editor, I’ve slathered everything short of butter onto my face: argan, coconut, rosehip, sandalwood, chia, neroli, calendula, mandarin, macadamia, rice bran, seabuckthorn, patchouli, grapefruit seed, sesame seed, soybean, sweet almond, pomegranate seed, lemon myrtle, sunflower seed—even extra virgin olive oil from my pantry when I was desperate. I’ve washed my face with oil-based cleansers, and dabbed expensive mixtures being sold as “face oils” onto my skin in hopes of achieving that Instagram-ready glow. Contrary to popular belief, the right oil is actually good for your face and won’t clog your pores. Your skin needs a reasonable amount of oil to do its business; as a matter of fact, if you scrub away all your natural face oil (as I was prone to do with rubbing alcohol as a frustrated and misguided pizza-faced teen), you may actually be prone to more breakouts as your skin tries to make up for the imbalance. As cannabis meets up with the mainstream beauty world, cannabidiol (CBD) oil may be the next big thing.
A group of specialists at the National Cancer Institute reviewed some experiments rhesus monkeys and rodents whose results implied that CBD has the capacity to inhibit the division of cancerous cells (especially in types of leukemia and lymphoma), to lower the probability of affected tissue to spread to neighboring tissues, and to increase the effectiveness of macrophage cells to attack cancerous cells.[20][21]
Putting this in perspective, eating a portion of grapefruit would have a similar effect on the aforementioned liver enzymes. So neutralizing P450 enzymes should be viewed as a minor side effect of cannabidiol. However, if you are taking pharmaceutical drugs and wish to take CBD, you should discuss any potential complications regarding reduced P450 enzyme activity with your doctor and/or pharmacist.
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