Oils are hot in the beauty world. As a beauty editor, I’ve slathered everything short of butter onto my face: argan, coconut, rosehip, sandalwood, chia, neroli, calendula, mandarin, macadamia, rice bran, seabuckthorn, patchouli, grapefruit seed, sesame seed, soybean, sweet almond, pomegranate seed, lemon myrtle, sunflower seed—even extra virgin olive oil from my pantry when I was desperate. I’ve washed my face with oil-based cleansers, and dabbed expensive mixtures being sold as “face oils” onto my skin in hopes of achieving that Instagram-ready glow. Contrary to popular belief, the right oil is actually good for your face and won’t clog your pores. Your skin needs a reasonable amount of oil to do its business; as a matter of fact, if you scrub away all your natural face oil (as I was prone to do with rubbing alcohol as a frustrated and misguided pizza-faced teen), you may actually be prone to more breakouts as your skin tries to make up for the imbalance. As cannabis meets up with the mainstream beauty world, cannabidiol (CBD) oil may be the next big thing.
A study highlighting this was performed approximately one decade ago. The study found a link between IBS sufferers and clinical endocannabinoid deficiency, which relates back to the fact that the system directly impacts intestinal motility and function. When CBD was used to activate and regulate the endocannabinoid system, sufferers of IBS saw significant symptom improvement. (42)
A few years ago it was still believed that CBD has no side effects. Well, at least no negative ones, because CBD works in many ways and the side effects that it had were always good ones. In the sense of, “I use CBD for something specific and as a side effect it also helps with something else. But over the years of studies (though there are still too few of them) and experience, a few side effects have been identified. But do not worry, these are not life-threatening side effects. Now let’s look at the toxicity of CBD, the possible side effects, and the safety of CBD.
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Just last year, Herbivore launched Emerald, a hemp-infused oil, and a few months later, it's unveiling its CBD-infused twin. Like the original, the new Herbivore Botanicals Emerald 100mg CBD Deep Moisture Glow Oil formulation packs a hydrating punch, but also provides the calming and soothing effects of the ingredient. Plus, the brand will donate $1 from every Emerald sale to support cannabis legalization efforts as well as female-owned organizations in the cannabis industry.
Our bodies are thought to produce endocannabinoids by the billions every day. “We always thought the ‘runner’s high’ was due to the release of dopamine and endorphins. But now we know the euphoria is also from an endocannabinoid called anandamide,” its name derived from the Sanskrit word for bliss, says Joseph Maroon, MD, clinical professor and vice chairman of neurosurgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. We produce these natural chemicals all day, but they fade quickly because enzymes pop up to destroy them. That’s where CBD comes in: By blocking these enzymes, CBD allows the beneficial compounds to linger.

Unlike THC, the psychoactive compound which is responsible for giving you that high effect, CBD, is non-psychoactive and a proven aid for nausea, pain, and anxiety (plus, if extracted from industrial hemp, it’s legal). CBD is also known to be anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, cell-regenerative, and anti–cell proliferative for bad cells. This means that CBD is a potential therapy for a range of medical conditions.

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