Great points and thanks for the clarification. To be clear, THC products are not readily available to purchase online (legally), so anyone hoping to try the CBD oil trend will have to settle for these alternatives for the time being, until the FDA approves more variations. Many people who are new to CBD see these options as a good entry-point before they experiment with larger mg amounts, and the reviews online are strong. Still, you are correct that full spectrum CBD oils may ultimately be better once they are legally approved to sell online to everyone.
I think being safe to eat is a moot point. These are topical products. I don’t think anybody is buying to eat them. It’s just a marketing tactic. In regards to the chapsticks, unless you were trying to literally eat the chapstick I think whatever negligible amount may make it past your lips and into your mouth, would certainly not be a health concern from any of these products. What concerns me more is there is zero efficacy with all of these products. Do they just decide over breakfast how much CBD needs to be added for the dosage to work? It’s ridiculous that they are marketing it as safe to eat, and people are buying into that bs and providing no clinical studies or research at all. Just my 2 cents
It is thought that by applying the correct amount of cannabis, the cannabinoids can help with the promotion of lipids which help fight chronic skin conditions including acne and psoriasis. Some also claim that cannabis oil has the power to remove wrinkles and skin spots. While we wouldn’t bank on it being the “anti-aging” miracle, it is helping millions of people worldwide deal with a variety of skin diseases including eczema and rosacea.
This isn’t new but had to be mentioned. One of the major and well-known benefits of cannabis is its ability to treat pain and helping with pain management. It has the capabilities of assisting with chronic pain as well as inflammation. Furthermore, it has been found to help patients deal with severe rheumatism and arthritis as well as other chronic pains.
The effects of CBD on receptors in the immune system may help reduce overall inflammation in the body. In turn, CBD oil may offer benefits for acne management. A human study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigationfound that the oil prevented activity in sebaceous glands. These glands are responsible for producing sebum, a natural oily substance that hydrates the skin. Too much sebum, however, can lead to acne.
Before I even checked the ingredients list and saw that cocoa seed butter was involved, my first impression was that this body butter smelled like chocolate, so much so that my stomach rumbled with hunger because it was 4pm and I hadn’t eaten lunch yet. Don’t the “whipped” descriptor fool you—unlike most body butters you’ve used, this formula is solid to the touch, a balm rather than a cream. But that might be exactly what you want if you’re looking for a CBD-infused treatment anyway—something that feels extra-nourishing and almost medicinal. Luckily, it smells incredible in a subtle, natural way, not like other body butters with artificial tropical fruit scents.
          Although CBD oil has been legalized in most states, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is subject to a very different set of restrictions. Like the CBD, THC is the cannabinoid that can be extracted from the cannabis plant. Although many petroleum products based on the CBD sell themselves as insulators and THC-free, the absence of federal regulations on these products means you can be deceived.
Previously, I had reviewed hemp-based beauty topicals and THC beauty products pioneering the way for cannabis in the skincare industry. This time, I tested the diverse range of CBD oil-based beauty products, which are both potent and legally available for shipping to most states. This is the new frontier in skincare—and these companies are paving the way. Go support them before Sephora hears about this.
           New Drug code 7350; As a result of the financing Act and the Agriculture Act, the United States Drug Supervision Administration (DEA) clarifies the legality of the CBD. The new 7350 drug code explains that the CBD acquired from industrial cannabis is legal, by the Agriculture Act 2014. However, the CBD must be derived from legal parts of the cannabis plant, such as stems.
Because CBD works with specific neurotransmitters to reduce anxiety and increase the ability to focus, initial studies have shown promise in its ability to increase the quality of life by decreasing the symptoms of ADHD for many sufferers. Much of this research is still in the early phases (with a lot of room to learn more), however, CBD may be worth adding to a daily routine for those frustrated with traditional treatment options.
Social media is blasting this one out lately, showing that different parents have been treating their children illegally (in states that are not classed as medical states) to help prevent their children from having seizures or deal with epilepsy. While there has been limited scientific evidence on the topic, 2016 was a major turning point for the plant as a major study was conducted by Orrin Devinsky, a neurologist at New York University Langone Medical Center, showing profound results.
People who experience psychosis may produce too much or even too little cannabinoids (from overactive dopamine receptors). CBD is milder than our internal cannabinoids and helps to re-establish a balance of cannabinoids in the brain. CBD also helps lower inflammation, which is often increased in schizophrenia. THC, on the other hand, is stronger than our internal cannabinoids (anandamide and 2-AG), this way potentially triggering psychosis [46, 48].
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